A wide ribbon of glass is cooled and cut as it moves along the float line at the Nashville Carlex plant (formerly Ford Glass) Source: https://nashvillepublicmedia.org/blog/2011/06/02/carlex-brings-stability-to-nashville-glass-plant/.

A wide ribbon of glass is cooled and cut as it moves along the float line at the Nashville Carlex plant (formerly Ford Glass)
Source: https://nashvillepublicmedia.org/blog/2011/06/02/carlex-brings-stability-to-nashville-glass-plant/.

The Charlotte Park neighborhood in West Nashville has been changing like the rest of Nashville over the past few years but it is still rich in history.  With street names like Thunderbird, Comet, Galaxie, and Continental, people often wonder why they are named after Ford vehicles. A recent Nextdoor post asking this question sparked over 70 replies in 2 days that encompassed a lot of "remember when..." posts of old businesses and ferry rides across the Cumberland.    

The Ford glass plant was built in 1956 at 7200 Centennial Boulevard and brought many jobs to the area. 

Section 1 of Charlotte Park subdivision was platted and recorded on February 5, 1957. 1 story brick ranch homes were then built with other sections that followed into the 1960's.  According to one of the long-time residents of Charlotte Park, James Catron, " These homes were built by independent contractors, some of which I know or knew at that time. The street names were used as a "thank you" to Ford for bringing employment to Nashvile."

There is also the adjacent neighborhood, Croleywood, with street names such as Alamo Place, Croley Drive, Leslie Avenue, and Stevenson Street.  Recently this community has been lumped into the name Charlotte Park.  James Catron clarifies: " Streets that run off Robertson Rd and other nearby streets have tried to become part of Charlotte Park but these were built before Ford Glass Plant came here.  This has been a very good neighborhood for years and I have been in my home for 52 years."

The general rule of thumb is if it is a brick ranch it is Charlotte Park, if it is not, it is Croleywood.

A neat trait of this part of town is the variety of older and newly built homes. Brick ranch homes built in the 60's  were typically built very stout. Since they are 1-story with efficient floor plans, people can age in place like Mr. Catron and many of his neighbors. Croleywood provides a good mix of renovated cottages on larger lots than one can find in the Nations. These homes along with the new homes brings diversity thus a strong community.

As these neighborhoods are in transition we decided to build one of our recent homes with a "transitional" approach at 625B Waco Drive just off of Robertson Road.

 Transitional Designed Home at 625B Waco Drive

Transitional Designed Home at 625B Waco Drive

Holly Sweetman, our in-house designer describes the home:

"The style of 625 B Waco is Transitional which is a beautiful marriage of traditional and contemporary to create a timeless design. The aim of creating in this style was to make a home that feels warm and cozy, while remaining simple and sophisticated.  We did this by picking finishes and materials that are classic so they won’t be dated in a few years, like the chrome plumbing fixtures and the gray tile and paint pallet. While also picking features that have straight lines and rounded profiles to remain modern and on trend, such as the clean line range hood and the arch entering the living area. The combination of these qualities create a home that feels fresh and modern but will transition over the years and feel ageless."

If you or you know someone looking to move to West Nashville, fill them in about the interesting history while also telling them about this unique one-of-a-kind home they can enjoy for years to come. 

For more information, visit our For Sale Page.